Murrayromans
The Epistle to the Romans
Author: John Murray
Category: Commentaries

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Highlights

  • Former volume of the New International Commentary of the New Testament
  • series

Product Details

Careful scholarship and spiritual insight characterize this enduring commentary on Romans, generally considered to be Paul's most profound letter. In The Epistle to the Romans John Murray offers an exposition of Romans deeply penetrating in its elucidation of the text yet accessible to scholars, pastors, and students alike.

In his introduction to the commentary proper, Murray discusses the authorship, occasion, purpose, and contents of Romans and provides important background information on the church at Rome. Murray then provides a verse-by-verse exposition of the text that takes into account key problems that have emerged in the older and newer literature. In ten appendices that close the volume Murray gives special attention to themes and scholarly debates that are essential for a full-orbed understanding of Romans—the meaning of justification, the relation of Isaiah 53:11 to the message of Romans, Karl Barth on Romans 5, the interpretation of the "weak brother" in Romans 14, and more.

This combined edition of Murray's original two-volume work, formerly published as part of the New International Commentary on the New Testament series, will hold continued value as a scholarly resource in the study of Romans for years to come.

About the Author
John Murray (1898-1975) was born in Scotland, educated in Glasgow, Edinburgh, and Princeton, and spent most of his distinguished career teaching systematic theology at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Endorsements

There is a wealth of good volumes on Romans. Hodge is like a course on systematic theology, Haldane is sound and throbs with life, but if forced to choose, invest in Murray
W.J. Grier, The Best Books