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NICOT: The Book of Judges
Author: Barry G. Webb
Nicotjudges
$51.95

Available on Desktop available Cloud available Ios available Android available

This product is an electronic addition to your WORDsearch 11 , WORDsearch 10, or FREE WORDsearch Basic program. This is not a physical book or a stand-alone program.

Product Details

About the New International Commentary

The New International Commentary combines readability with expert scholarship, and is highly regarded by theologians, preachers, and Bible students. The volumes in this commentary bridge the gap between today’s world and that of Bible times.

Each commentary opens with an introduction to the biblical book and examines its background, authorship, date, purpose, structure, and theology. The authors, who are world-renowned biblical authorities, provide their own translation from the original language to form the basis of the commentary proper. Verse-by-verse comments nicely balance in-depth discussions of technical matters. What follows is a scholarly explanation of the text and its implications for today's application.

The original Hebrew and Greek texts are carefully studied, and critical comments are footnoted. Plus, all grammatical, textual, and historical details are appended. The commentary proper incorporates this information in a way that aids your understanding of the text.

The contributors to the New International Commentary aim to help you understand God’s word as clearly as possible.

About Judges

Eminently readable, exegetically thorough, and written in an emotionally warm style that flows from his keen sensitivity to the text, Barry Webb's commentary on Judges is just what is needed to properly engage a dynamic, narrative work like the book of Judges. It discusses not only unique features of the stories themselves but also such issues as the violent nature of Judges, how women are portrayed in it, and how it relates to the Christian gospel of the New Testament.

Webb concentrates throughout on what the biblical text itself throws into prominence, giving space to background issues only when they cast significant light on the foreground. For those who want more, the footnotes and bibliography provide helpful guidance. The end result is a welcome resource for interpreting one of the most challenging books in the Old Testament.

About the Author

Barry G. Webb is senior research fellow emeritus in Old Testament at Moore Theological College, Sydney, Australia, where he taught for thirty-three years.

Check out a sample of this commentary by clicking on the yellow “Sample” button under the book cover on this page.

This book also available within the following bundles:

  • Nicotbundle New International Commentary on the Old Testament
  • Newinterncom2 New International Commentary on the Old and New Testaments
  • Critical Reviews

    I have always felt cheated by the kind of exegetical vivisection that kills by analysis until all that's left is lifeless bits and pieces, classified and arranged, conquered rather than read. For me the text is a living thing, whose life has to be respected if it is to be understood. . . . Judges is not a nice book. It's rough and raw and confronting. Working on it has been like living with someone who always tells you the truth: it is good for you, but not pleasant. In this commentary I have tried to let Judges be what it is instead of taming it.