Eggnteph
Exegetical Guide to the Greek New Testament: Ephesians
Author: Benjamin L Merkle, Andreas J. Köstenberger (General Editor), and Robert W. Yarbrough (General Editor)
Publisher: B&H Academic
Category: Commentaries

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Highlights

  • Brief introduction on authorship, date, occasion, and purpose
  • List of recommended commentaries
  • Extensive exegetical notes
  • Comprehensive exegetical outline

Product Details

As students and ministers of God's Word, you know that the closer you can get to the original texts, the better you can preach, teach, and understand the Bible. The Exegetical Guide to the Greek New Testament (EGGNT) is written and researched to provide all the necessary information for understanding the Greek text. Each volume also includes homiletical helps and suggestions for further study.

The EGGNT was written to serve a wide variety of readers. If you are consulting the Greek text for the first time you will appreciate the assistance with vocabulary, parsing, and translation. If you have some experience in Greek you may want to skip or skim these sections and focus attention on the discussions of grammar. More advanced students may choose to pursue the topics, references, and technical works under "For Further Study." Pastors will enjoy the transitions from grammatical analysis to sermon outline. Teacherswill appreciate having a resource that frees them to focus on exegetical details and theological matters.

Many of the other reference tools in your digital library will be enhanced with the EGGNTalongside them. Having a Bible, the EGGNT, and a Greek interlinear open side-by-side can make it easy to consult a passage in English and see the text in Greek with each word transliterated and translated. The EGGNT takes you deeper into the original text, pointing out details and nuances that might otherwise be overlooked. Furthermore, the EGGNTmakes "Homiletical Suggestions," nuggets of gold for your preaching and teaching.

The EGGNT will make interpreting Ephesians easier, while also adding scholarship and depth to your studies of God’s Word. This is especially helpful for those who are hard-pressed for time and yet want to preach or teach with accuracy and authority.

About the Author
Benjamin L. Merkle is professor of New Testament and Greek at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. He is the author or editor of several books including 40 Questions about Elders and Deacons, Why Elders? A Biblical and Practical Guide for Church Members, and Those Who Must Give an Account: A Study of Church Membership and Church Discipline.

Endorsements

Ben Merkle's commentary on Ephesians should be on the shelf of everyone who studies the Greek text of Ephesians. Three things stand out in this commentary. First, the structure of the text is nicely portrayed so that readers can see the flow of the argument. These structural layouts alone are worth the price of the book. Second, the book concisely and clearly sets forth the various grammatical options. Merkle fairly and wisely adjudicates among the various options. Third, Merkle's commentary on the text captures well the theology in one of Paul's most important letters.
Thomas R. Schreiner, James Buchanan Harrison Professor of New Testament Interpretation, professor of biblical theology, and associate dean of the School of Theology, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary
If you're most interested in plumbing the depths of the Greek text, Merkle offers what few others do—a thorough, linguistically accurate, judicious, clear, and trustworthy exegesis of the text. He goes beyond merely commenting on commentators. Here you will find original exegesis at its finest.
J. Scott Duvall, professor of New Testament and J. C. and Mae Fuller Chair of Biblical Studies, Ouachita Baptist University
The new volume will prove of inestimable value to students studying the Greek text of Paul's Letter to the Ephesians, providing arguments for differing options of analyzing Greek phrases and guidance for making informed decisions. And scholars will find grammatical and syntactical analyses that even the larger commentaries often do not engage in. The book, as well as the entire series, should be on the bookshelf of anyone reading the New Testament in Greek.
Eckhard J. Schnabel, Mary F. Rockefeller Distinguished Professor of New Testament Studies, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary