Nicntcol
NICNT: The Letter to the Colossians (2018)

This title works with the following Wordsearch products

Desktop | Web | iPhone/iPad | Android
$55.00
This product is an electronic addition to your Wordsearch digital library. It is not a physical product or a stand-alone program.

This book is also available within the following bundle

Product Details

In the letter to the Colossians, Paul offers a compelling vision of the Christian life; his claims transcend religion and bring politics, culture, spirituality, power, ethnicity, and more into play. This exegetical and theological commentary by Scot McKnight delves deeply into Paul's message in Colossians and draws out the theology that underpins it.

McKnight interacts closely with the text of Colossians itself while bringing the best of biblical scholarship to the table. He focuses on reading Colossians in the context of Paul's other letters, his theology, and his mission to preach the gospel to the Gentiles. Crafted specifically for preachers and teachers, this engaging and accessible commentary offers fresh light on Colossians.

About the New International Commentary New Testament Series
“. . . undertaken to provide earnest students of the New Testament with an exposition that is thorough and abreast of modern scholarship and at the same time loyal to the Scriptures as the infallible Word of God.”

This statement reflects the underlying purpose of The New International Commentary on the New Testament. Begun in the late 1940s by an international team of New Testament scholars, the NICNT series has become recognized by pastors, students, and scholars alike as a critical yet orthodox commentary marked by solid biblical scholarship within the evangelical Protestant tradition.

While based on a thorough study of the Greek text, the commentary introductions and expositions contain a minimum of Greek references. The NICNT authors evaluate significant textual problems and take into account the most important exegetical literature. More technical aspects — such as grammatical, textual, and historical problems — are dealt with in footnotes, special notes, and appendixes.

Under the general editorship of three outstanding New Testament scholars — first Ned Stonehouse (Westminster Theological Seminary, Philadelphia), then F. F. Bruce (University of Manchester, England), and now Gordon D. Fee (Regent College, Vancouver, British Columbia) — the NICNT series has continued to develop over the years. In order to keep the commentary “new” and conversant with contemporary scholarship, the NICNT volumes have been — and will be — revised or replaced as necessary.

The newer NICNT volumes in particular take into account the role of recent rhetorical and sociological inquiry in elucidating the meaning of the text, and they also exhibit concern for the theology and application of the text. As the NICNT series is ever brought up to date, it will continue to find ongoing usefulness as an established guide to the New Testament text.

About the Author:

Scot McKnight is the Julius R. Mantey Professor of New Testament at Northern Seminary, Lombard, Illinois. His many other books include The Jesus Creed: Loving God, Loving Others; A Community Called Atonement; NIV Application Commentary volumes on Galatians and 1 Peter; and (coedited with James D. G. Dunn) The Historical Jesus in Recent Research.

Endorsements

Scot McKnight’s commentary on Colossians offers everything one could want: a lively and readable exposition of the biblical text, with helpful observations on Greek grammar and translation; familiarity with primary sources that illumine the ancient context of this letter and the situation that evoked it; a wide-ranging acquaintance with issues in recent scholarship on Pauline theology; and sensitivity to the epistle’s theological claims and themes. Those committed to a careful study of this epistle will find McKnight a wise and judicious guide.
Marianne Meye Thompson, Fuller Theological Seminary
McKnight’s conservative approach to Paul incorporates insights from a broad spectrum of ‘new approaches’ to the apostle and his theology. His years of teaching Colossians in Greek provide detailed grammar analysis in footnotes. Insisting that Paul is above all a missionary and pastor for whom the new regime of King Jesus challenges the dark powers of imperialism, McKnight’s commentary offers pastors and other readers a fresh vision of church communities as the embodiment of God’s new creation.
Pheme Perkins, Boston College
This commentary by Scot McKnight provides a rare combination of readability, attention to linguistic details, and knowledge of contemporary scholarship on the letter to the Colossians. It is obviously the product of a career of reflection on this letter.
James W. Thompson, Abilene Christian University